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Hydrilla verticillata Information

HYDRILLA VERTICILLATA

THREAT:

Hydrilla is the world’s most successful aquatic invasive plant.

It rapidly spreads and causes severe impact to water quality, native plant and fish communities, recreation, irrigation, and water treatment facilities.

It is difficult and costly to control – multiple chemical applications across multiple years, the high cost of benthic matting and monitoring, and difficulty using triploid grass carp for control.

NYSDEC Fact Sheet

Presentation from July 13, 2017 Public Meeting (pdf) available here: Hydrilla_Public_Meeting

Presentation from the US Army Corp of Engineers from the June 21, 2017 Board Meeting (pdf) available here: Aurora Public Information Meeting 21JUN17

HYDRILLA POPULATIONS:

Counties:

There are 27 known infestations across NYS and in the following counties:

Orange, Broome, Erie, Kings, Monroe, Nassau, Niagara, Suffolk, Tompkins, Cayuga, Tioga, and Westchester

Finger Lakes PRISM-

Hydrilla growing along 27 acres of Cayuga Lake shoreline, south of Wells College. Project currently led by FL-PRISM.

 

Delineation Map and Report prepared by Bob Johnson with Racine-Johnson Aquatic Ecologists:  Hydrilla at Aurora NY FINAL 2016 Report Hydrilla Aurora Final Report
Specific threat of Hydrilla to Auora, Cayuga Lake: AuroraCayugaLakeHydrillaTalkingPoints Threats_to_Aurora
Hydrilla press release, Friday, 4 7 2017 PressRelease
Article from the Auburnpub.com: Hydrilla patch in Aurora threatens to spread with no funding, April 7, 2017. AuburnPub472017

Press:

  1. Corps of Engineers to reduce invasive Hydrilla plants in Cayuga Lake area, Buffalo, NY – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District will be helping to reduce the invasive Hydrilla plant (Hydrilla verticillata) in Cayuga Lake near Aurora, and in nearby Paines and Little creeks. “The newly discovered Hydrilla infestation in Cayuga Lake sounded the alarm for federal intervention, and I’m glad with this federal funding the Army Corps of Engineers can now mobilize to answer the call,” said Senator Charles Schumer. I’ll continue to push to preserve any and all federal resources to stop this threat before it spreads. The Army Corps’ work over the next weeks is the vital first step in containing—and eventually eradicating this devastating invasive that threatens the Finger Lakes region’s job creating, ecological and economic potential.” HydrillaTreatmentCayuga_061617_Release
  2. SCHUMER: RECENT DISCOVERY OF 27 ACRE AREA OF HYDRILLA IN CAYUGA LAKE MEANS INVASIVE SPECIES COULD SOON CONQUER WATERWAYS; SENATOR PUSHES FOR CRITICAL FED FUNDS TO HELP ERADICATE INVASIVE SPECIES ONCE AND FOR ALL.. read more here: Final Rls Seneca County Hydrilla Event 4.12.2017
  3. Sen. Schumer Seeks Funds to Fight Weeds in Finger Lakes. Sen. Charles Schumer is calling for $850,000 in federal funding to help remove an invasive weed that could choke out recreation in the Finger Lakes. | April 12, 2017, at 3:01 a.m.: https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/new-york/articles/2017-04-12/sen-schumer-seeks-funds-to-fight-weeds-in-finger-lakes
  4. Schumer calls for federal funding to stop spread of invasive weed in Cayuga Lake, By David Figura | dfigura@nyup.com, April 12, 2017 at 1:33 PM http://www.newyorkupstate.com/cayuga-lake/2017/04/schumer_calls_for_federal_funding_to_stop_spread_of_invasive_weed_in_cayuga_lake.html 

Other Projects in the Finger Lakes PRISM:

Tinker Nature Park, Henrietta, Monroe County, NY- ~1 acre of an artificially-created open-water pond in the Genesee River Watershed. Project managed by FL-PRISM.

Fall Creek and Cayuga Lake Inlet, Cayuga Lake, Tompkins County, NY project managed by Tompkins County Soul and Water Conservation District. Information available here.

Isolated ponds in Broome County- Management not being addressed at this location.

WNY PRISM

Tonawanda Creek/Erie Canal managed by the USACE. Information available here.

GreatLakesHydrillaRiskAssessment

 

 

 

Click image to left for information about the Great Lakes Hydrilla Collaborative and Risk Assessment in Tonawanda Creek/Erie Canal

 

 

 

Lower Hudson PRISM-

Croton River Hydrilla Control Project managed by NYS DEC. More information available here.

 

 

Benthic mats being placed at Tinker Nature Park, Monroe County, NY. Work contracted to Racine Johnson Aquatic Ecologists. Photo: Hilary Mosher, spring 2016

Sewing barrier Start- Cutting Cattails + Sewing Barrier
Tinker Barrier to SW Tinker Barrier to WEST Barrier sunk
Tinker Edge finishing Closeup of Tinker Barrier Seam  Crew sewing Barrier

HUGE CONCERN:

Shallow Northern shelf (5,800 acres) is prime habitat for the fast-growing, highly competitive Hydrilla to flourish and overrun the ecosystem, at which point control of the N. end of Cayuga Lake will be futile.

Due to the Finger Lakes’ heavy human use and high economic activity due to the lakes, Hydrilla is an unparalleled risk in Cayuga Lake proper.

The overall goal of the project is to eradicate Hydrilla from Cayuga Lake near Aurora, its connecting tributaries and prevent its spread further in Cayuga Lake, the other Finger LakOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAes, and the Great Lakes. Eradication of Hydrilla will help prevent native species decline and habitat loss from Hydrilla in other areas.

20160617_201948

Hydrilla (hydrilla verticillata)

Description: Hydrilla is a rooted, submerged, aquatic plant capable of growing in water depths up to 20 feet deep where water clarity is good. Its appearance can vary depending on the conditions under which it is growing. Generally, it is rooted to the bottom of waterways, but it can also survive if fragments break loose and free-float. It has long, slim stems that branch out and can form a mat on the water surface covering areas as large as 100 acres or more.

Threat: Hydrilla has serious economic effects resulting from the ecological impacts. As mentioned before, hydrilla can slow the movement of water, disrupting the water supply, impeding drainage and irrigation. This adds costs to the agricultural economy and also negatively affects real estate values that are dependent upon attractive nearby waterways.

Management: Keeping hydrilla out through information, education, monitoring, and control of infected water bodies. Controlling hydrilla populations while they are still small by harvesting with divers. Controlling large infestations of hydrilla with herbicides or biological control agents. Some herbicides are reasonably selective for hydrilla but must still be used with extreme care to minimize the impact upon native plants and the ecosystem.

 

NY State Ranking: Very High (Relative Maximum Score >80.00)

Occurrences In Finger Lakes (counties): Broome, Monroe, Tompkins, Cayuga, Tioga

Invasive Species Threats Presentation, Wells College, July 18, 2017 WellsCollege_7_18_17

Statewide Hydrilla Conference Call Information:

Statewide Hydrilla Meeting

Next Call:  Wednesday, August 9, 2017 | 11:00 am Eastern Daylight Time (GMT-04:00) | 1 hour